Attractions of Muktinath Temple as below:
Muktinath Kunda
In front of Muktinath Temple there are 2 Kunda (Water ponds). This is generally used for holy dipping and is believed to hold the power to wash away negative karma and the results of one’s past negative actions.
Jwala Mai Temple
A little below the Muktinath Temple you can see the Tibetan style Jwala Mai Temple. This Temple is famous for the water that it issues from a rock inside it. Inside this Temple behind a tattered curtain, are small natural gas jest that produce Continuously burning flame, the Jwala Mai temple has a spring and there are three eternal flames “Holy flame from soil”, “Holy flame from rock” and “Holy flame from water” fed by natural gas. Apparently two flames are continuously burning. The Hindus believe that this fire was lit as an offering made by Brahma himself, (the creator) as he set water on fire.

Gumba Samba
This is a monastery of Tibetan origin. Legend has it that the Syandol Lama, a monk from Tibet founded this monastery. This was actually used as a hostel for monks before collapsed and people of Khinga and Jharkot later restored it. The main deity’s Monastries are Sakyamuni, Chingresig and Guru Rimpoche. The monastery is situated at left from entrance gate of Muktinath temple complex, would be worth it.
Swaminarayan
A Hindu Guru by the name of Lord Shri Swaminarayan is generally associated with the Temple of Muktinath. Also known as a Satguru of Sabij Yoga, towards the end of the 18th century he practiced severe penance in Muktinath for two and a half months and attained the highest degree of proficiency in Nishkamvrat. In 2003 his followers funded the new wall around Muktinath and raised a small monument for him at Muktinath.
Shaligram
Another attraction for the pilgrimage is the River kali Gandaki from where one can collect fossils of the Jurassic age. You can also buy these fossils from the locals. Shaligram, a black stone fossil if found, is considered sacred and is kept in Pooja (prayer) room in the house. It is supposed to be symbol of Lord Vishnu. Gloriously described in Puranas as Krishnagandaki (Black Gandaki) as well as Chakranadi, and worshipped as one of the holiest rivers, Krishnagandaki consists of seven Gandaki rivers supposed to have sprung from cheek (Gandasthal) of Lord Vishnu.